Pre Written Expository Essays Samples

Current Trends and Issues that Affect Today’s Aged Population

In a world where everything seems to be achieved by the youthful and vigorous, ageing has become a challenge. Late adulthood, old age, and eventual death are inevitable for everyone, yet the subject, irrespective of its inescapability, can be found difficult to discuss or understand. This discussion makes an attempt to view these three life events or milestones, to show how one’s circumstances and attitudes can affect the ways in which they are handled by the family and society.

In her book Development Through the Lifespan, Laura E Berk (2009) demonstrates through case histories, interviews and anecdotes that although growing old occurs everywhere to everyone, they are not handled in the same way by all. There are marked cultural, societal and personal differences in the ways different adults, the two genders, and families treat ageing. The biological and psychological changes that accompany the onset of late adulthood, which include forgetfulness, fatigue, detachment, and helplessness as well as the pain and discomfort of rheumatism, cardiac and respiratory conditions, all contribute to issues that confront people (Berk 608). Acceptance of change, especially when it seems sudden and irrefutable, is seen to be extremely difficult by some, and yet others handle the same conditions with agreeableness and resistance. The reasons for this difference in the ability for some to accept changes in themselves or in their relatives better than others are not always clear (Berk 610).

One negative life change in ageing women is loss of self-esteem when they are no longer able to care for loved ones because of failing health. When men retire, they feel a sense of loss of identity if they associate character with occupation (Berk 611). Psychological well-being in both men and women can be restored through social support. Society provides this through a number of organizations, associations, religious groups and cultural establishments. It is found, however, that for social support to provide well-being for elders, it needs to be accompanied by a sense of control. Sometimes, Berk asserts, a trade-off can be made between life aspects older people can control and those they cannot, in order to feel in charge of their own lives. For example, stamina can be reserved for enjoyable occupations such as dancing or bowling by leaving shopping and housework to helpers and carers.

The sense of one’s mortality is not as remote in old age as before, and as one’s friends begin to pass away, approaching death can depress or alarm some old people. Although it is easy to agree with the author of this book when she states that death is necessary in the life of any species to ensure its survival, humans do not always find it easy to accept. Death, dying and bereavement are strong life milestones sustained by cultural attitudes, outlooks and customs. Modern society seems to be more distanced from the reality of death than earlier generations, simply because people no longer die at home as often they used to (Berk 642). In addition, when people are depressed or in pain, they are more likely to suffer from death anxiety, which can be accompanied by reluctance to discuss it with others, which could bring about relief of the condition.

When a loved one passes away, older people are likely to be worse affected than others, because their own mortality and transience is emphasized by the event. Their grief is made more personal by becoming a presage of what is inevitable. In some cultures and religions, what Berk terms ‘symbolic immortality’ that comes from belief in an everlasting soul, helps older people to regard life as worthwhile and enjoy their ability to pass on wisdom and skills to the next generation, even if their life is necessarily finite. This sense of worth avoids anxiety about death becoming extreme or debilitating (Berk 643).

Coping with ageing, approaching death, dying and bereavement are not easy for anyone, but for the elderly, they can seem a defeating part of life. To avoid this becoming problematic or pathological, a feeling of self- and societal-worth must be emphasized in the lives of all elderly people. In this way, they can approach the twilight of their lives with optimism, grace and dignity.

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An expository essay is a piece of written work that aims to define and investigate a topic for the reader. This can be accomplished in several ways: defining a term, comparing and contrasting, analyzing a cause and effect, etc. The main objective is to prove a thesis through factual evidence. Putting together an explanation might sound easy, but it is quite a challenge to write a convincing piece that defends your thesis!


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An easy way to understand what an expository essay is would be to look at it as a debate. When preparing for a debate, your goal would be to When researching and gathering information for your essay, it would be ideal to keep these thoughts in mind. Think about writing with your reader’s questions in mind. When a reader is enlightened, that’s a definite sign that you have created some fantastic literature!



5 Main Types of Expository Writing

There are 5 main types of expository essays:

  • Descriptive Essay(/blog/descriptive-essay/): This is an essay in which the writer is asked to describe something. This could be a person, place, experience, situation, etc. Descriptive Essays are unique in the sense that you have a lot of freedom when it comes to the content. You should present something exciting or beautiful, all the while keeping the reader interested.

  • Process Essay: The classic “How To” assignment. The purpose of this essay is to teach the reader about learning a process: How to build a car, how to edit a paper or even how to flirt with a girl!

  • Comparison Essay: Simple sounding enough, a comparison essay makes you critically analyze any two subjects, finding and explaining their similarities and/or differences.

  • Cause and Effect Essay: The “Knee-Jerk” reaction assignment. Cause and effect essays are concerned with why and or how things happen and what happens as a result.

  • Problem / Solution Essay: The universal standard prompt assignment. In this situation, we have a problem and are looking for solutions. The essay is broken down into a brief intro to the problem and filled with content about the solutions.

What is the Purpose?

Spend some time thinking about the purpose of your writing. Why are you writing an expository essay? What are you trying to accomplish with this essay? Find some reasons as to why you are writing it and the overall goal. If it was assigned by your school teacher, read the assignment guidelines scrupulously.

Break the Ice

Before you begin writing a paper, take time and build up your ideas before deciding on an essay topic. If you want to simplify the process, you can try activities such as listing, clustering, freewriting, and questioning. These will help you brainstorm ideas for your essay.

  • Listing: Put all your thoughts on paper. Look over this list and group similar ideas. This will help you narrow down your options.

  • Clustering: Take a blank piece of paper and write a brief explanation of the topic and circle it. Then draw three more lines extending from the bigger circle. Write corresponding ideas at the end of the lines. Keep going and build your cluster until you create as many connections as necessary.

  • Freewriting: Turn on non-stop mode for about 10 minutes. Write whatever comes to your mind. As you finish writing, review what you have written. Underline or highlight the most appropriate information. Then sort out things that you have written by sections. Use this trick until you come up with the most suitable topic.

  • Questioning: On a piece of paper write: “Who? How? What? Why? When? Where?”. Answer each question with as much detail as possible. This will give you an outline for your writing to build on.

Expository Essay Topics (examples)

  • Descriptive Essay:
  • Describe a time when you experienced depression, and what you believe led to that?
  • Describe a tricky situation you were in, and how you managed to handle it.
  • Process Essay:
  • Develop a tutorial and describe the process of building a custom computer.
  • Create a step by step tutorial of solving a common societal problem, i.e. littering.
  • Comparison Essay:
  • Compare and Contrast Apple with Windows. Which product is better in which sphere? Which product is more user-friendly?
  • Compare and Contrast living standards in the USA and Mexico.
  • Cause and Effect Essay:
  • What are the causes and effects of procrastination?
  • What can be done to improve time efficiency?
  • Describe the causes and effect of cheating at school. How do we teach students to avoid this behavior?
  • Problem / Solution Essay:
  • How can we as a society reduce or even eliminate racism?
  • How can we motivate students to increase effort at school?

The Subject Makes or Breaks the Essay

There is a chance that your work may fall flat if you have not chosen one of the really good expository essay topics. Not all topics out there are interesting or meaty enough to be thoroughly investigated within a paper. Make sure you put effort into choosing a topic that has a lot of material to cover it and pique the interest of readers!

  • Trending Topics: Are there any hot issues that deserve some deep discussion? If so, consider educating people on this seemingly new occurrence through the use of a well-written essay.
    • A topic close to your heart: It is easy much easier to defend a thesis if you find yourself passionately thinking about the topic. If you have an advocacy and want to inform others, choose this path and you might be able to sway beliefs!

    Comparing the past and the present is a good way of framing an argument, especially if a lot has been written about it.

    Do not Forget to…

    Come Up With A Catchy Title

    It is often considered the best approach to grab your audiences attention with a catchy title. As we all know it is quite common for people to judge a book by its cover, despite having been told that it is not always the case. Nonetheless, when students are aware of such a challenge they can take the time needed to craft a title that will do their work justice.

    Gather research on your Topic

    Hey, Sherlock Holmes, it’s time to do some detective work! Before you start out with the content, ponder upon your thesis and gather supporting documents for your paper. This is as important as the people in the courtroom, in the sense that a statement means nothing without sufficient evidence. Research should not only agree with your arguments but come from reputable and credible sources as well. It should also be up to date and relevant to the discussion at hand.

    This is an important step that our writers recommend you to take before you start writing. Before you start writing, it is advised to consider the expectations and needs of the readers. If there are guidelines for the expository essay, you need to follow them strictly and write accordingly. Include everything that might have been expected by your instructor.

    Create a Thesis

    A powerful thesis statement expresses the main argument of the paper. It should take a clear stance in the debate/topic and should not be more than two sentences in length.

    TIPS:

    • Make sure your thesis is debatable. Do not state facts or sentences that have no purpose. For example, "Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth president of the United States," is not an appropriate thesis because it states a fact.

    • Your statement should provide enough details. Try to avoid just saying that something is "good" or "effective." Instead of these, say what makes something "good" or "effective”.

    The Format / Structure

    Even if you are not familiar with writing an expository essay, you will realize that it is like any other academic paper that seeks for you to display your informed argument about a certain topic. This is especially true for the short papers you will experience in examinations, testing you about facts that you should have learned throughout the course. Also, it is very helpful to create a graphic organizer for assistance.

    Create an Outline

    There might be a lot of things you want to talk about, but in the end, there is a need to get straight to the point. To aid you in the quest of making an expository essay with brevity and straightforwardness, create an outline that corresponds to your points, arguments, and research.

    Outline Format

    The 5 paragraph format is the universal standard for expository essays, meaning it is recommended to write within this style. The paragraphs follow this order: Introduction, Body Paragraph 1, Body Paragraph 2, Body Paragraph 3 and Conclusion.

    Craft an Intriguing Introduction

    Expository essays are not meant to be opinionated pieces, so introductions that include a personal plight – as is the usual fare when asked to write an essay - are out of the question. Examples of interesting introductions would be to cite relevant news articles and historical events to introduce your topic. Starting off with a significant occurrence, discovery, or study will give you more points in factual research as well.

    Construct an Eloquent and Informative Body

    The body paragraphs should have at least 2-3 Arguments and a Counterargument : Each argument deserves its own paragraph. They also need to have supporting documents, like facts and statistics, to make the reader believe what you are trying to say.

    While most people have got the argument and evidence part of an essay down, they forget to include another important piece. One way to make a paper more complete would be to address a point that argues against the thesis and then disprove it through logic or statistics. It effectively tells your reader that you have thought about your topic from multiple angles!

    Writing Process

    What is the number?

    The common length of an expository essay is five-paragraphs; however, it can definitely be longer than that. Check your assignment guidelines or ask your teacher if you are not sure about the required length.

    Start each body paragraph with a topic sentence

    Do it to introduce the main idea of the paragraph. It should introduce the claim that will be defended in said body paragraph.

    Present a Claim

    A claim is a sentence that can be arguable but is used as a primary point to support or prove an argument. Your claim should be a statement that can relate to the thesis statement and makes it stronger.

    Supporting Evidence

    After you have started a topic sentence, support it with specific evidence from your research.

    Finish With A Concluding Statement

    Write how the evidence you have provided in that paragraph connects to your thesis. Explain the significance of the claim in regards to the overall argument.

    Keep Things Moving Smoothly

    To keep your writing smooth, make sure your paragraphs transition well. Furthermore, the conclusion of each body paragraph should summarize your main point.

    Show Assertiveness in the Conclusion

    The conclusion answers the questions you have brought out in the reader through the introduction while calling back the arguments you have laid out. An essay conclusion should be a construction made of the past few paragraphs. Don’t repeat your words like a broken record. You need to do a straightforward synthesis that delivers an impact upon your reader.

    Bring the final thought or call to action

    Imagine that the last sentence of your essay would be your last words. What would you say? How would you call people to action? Spend time thinking about these questions to make your final sentence like a time bomb.

    TIPS:

    • Explain the significance of your topic;
    • Explain how it affects the audience;
    • Call them to action;
    • Present new questions to think about.

    Edit and fact check

    Once the expository essay is complete, you should read it over once or twice. Often, people get excited over adding new information, making a messy paper with no direction, so cut down if you need to. Next, recheck all the facts and statistics you cited. You never know, you might end up contradicting yourself if you didn’t look into your sources carefully.

    Essay Writing Advice From Our Professional Team

    Dr. Judy, from EssayPro

    This article describes the writing process of an expository essay with a focus on some general types of expository essays. A point that I want to articulate is that each paragraph in your expository essay should have its idea. This would allow your essay to be clear and have minimal repetition. Each paragraph should also have a logical connection to the thesis and argument that you are making. A common mistake that newbie writers make is getting off track and adding information that doesn’t connect to the main point of your essay. You can avoid that easily by creating a well-structured outline and linking each of your paragraphs back to your thesis at the end of each paragraph. Another tip that I have for you is to try to be creative in your essay! Academic writing does not have to be boring. The truth is, you may not be writing a creative masterpiece, but you don’t have to be bone-dry with your writing. Leave a lasting impression on your reader!

    Do you have an Expository Essay prompt but have no idea where to start?

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